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Willmarth-Bushido: The Way of the Warrior-T

Model: T-JW-BUS

Availability: In Stock

$13.00

The samurai of Japan were not merely trained assasins but lived by a strict ethical code known as Bushido (literally meaning "the way of the warrior"). This code influenced all aspects of life and is comparable to the Western concept of c...
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Willmarth-Bushido: The Way of the Warrior-T - Product Information

The samurai of Japan were not merely trained assasins but lived by a strict ethical code known as Bushido (literally meaning "the way of the warrior"). This code influenced all aspects of life and is comparable to the Western concept of chivalry. The samurai were, of course, fierce warriors but also strongly believed in honor, kindness, frugal living, and above all, loyalty to their lord.

The ultimate honor was to die in service to one's master. In fact, the samurai considered suicide, called seppuku, a brave and admirable alternative to being defeated in battle. As the samurai began their decline and eventual abolishment in 1871, Bushido became the moral standard of the Japanese culture. There are seven principals that embody the spirit of Bushido including:
Gi (recitude), Rei (respect), Makoto (honesty), and Chugi (loyalty).

The three movements of this piece represent the Bushido principals of Jin (benevolance), Meiyo (honor and glory) and Yu (courage). Each movement is intended to emphasize a different facet of the timpani and aspect of Japanese music. Jin is a soundscape and therefore deals primarily with color and timbre. It should convey a meditative and reflective mood as well as the kind and wise nature of the samurai. Meiyo focuses on the melodic potential of the timpani and utilizes pedaling to create an "eastern" tonality. It is song-like in character and should exemplify the proud tradition and history of the samurai. Yu explores the rhythmic potential of the timpani and is strongly influenced by the Taiko drumming tradition. It is intended to depict the fierce nature of the samurai in battle.

-John Willmarth

Number of Players: 1
Difficulty: Grade 4+
Instrumentation:
  • Player 1: 4 Timpani




  • John Willmarth is an active performer, composer, author, and educator in the central Kentucky area. A versatile percussionist, Willmarth is experienced in many areas of percussion including jazz, concert, marching, and world percussion.

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    Pretty good.

    Comments:

    I felt kinda gyped on the first movement, but the second and third almost made up for that. Really interesting piece that is definitely a crowd pleaser. The second movement had you playing a melody on the drums and third movement is just ridiculous fast. 4/5

    Date Posted:

    Posted By:

    Tanner C Lynn

    Rating:

    4.00

    Bushido

    Comments:

    Two-thirds of this piece is great - the second and third movements. The first is a bit too "colour-oriented" to be a beginning movement; I'd much rather start with a movement that explores the melodic possibilities of the timpani before moving on to simulated wind sounds, etc. But, an easy fix would be to play this piece with the first and second movements reversed; what do you think?

    Date Posted:

    Posted By:

    Tom Shriver

    Rating:

    4.00
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